The Sundarban World Heritage Mangrove Forest demands immediate conservation

Tiger attacks are one of the rarer fieldwork safety concerns here at the Institute, but they were a serious consideration for PhD student Swapan Kumar Sarker. Swapan’s research focuses on spatial analysis of biodiversity in the Bangladeshi Sundarban, the worlds largest continuous mangrove forest and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Already an accomplished researcher, with a […]

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The ones that get away—does intensive fishing make fish harder to catch?

Are humans changing the course of evolution in wild fish populations? A new study making media waves today provides tantalizing evidence of a mechanism by which this may happen. In our new Naturally Speaking Reports, one of our editors caught up with Institute Senior Research Fellow Shaun Killen, the author of the study, to find out more about […]

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Caking it easy

Summer can be a quiet time around the Institute with many of our researchers out in the field collecting data, away at conferences, or off on holiday. So, before we get back to our usual programme of stimulating research—and you are in for some treats soon—we thought we would kick back and take it easy with some cake. […]

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Episode 28 – At war with worms: an interview with nematode parasitologist Collette Britton

Globally around one billion people are infected by parasitic nematodes, and their impact on livestock can be devastating. For millennia, parasites and hosts have been locked in an evolutionary war, an arms race with ever changing goal posts. However, scientists are using modern technology to bring new weapons to the fore. Here, Naturally Speaker James […]

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